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WHY GET INVOLVED?

As a charitable trust, Rhino Ark depends on the support of well-wishers who share our vision, mission and passion. Besides financial donations, we therefore invite people to contribute in any other way they can by learning about our work and sharing what they learn with the world.

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WHY DONATE?

Rhino Ark is a charitable trust and our success in developing sustainable solutions to the threats facing mountain forest ecosystems in Kenya is anchored in the support we get from donors. We would like you to be part of our mission and success.

 
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FAQ's
What is the status of the Mau Eburu Fence Project?

Construction of the Eburu Electric Fence started in March 2013 and was completed on 26 November 2014. The completed fence, built along the gazetted Eburu Forest Reserve boundary, is 43.3 kilometres long and completely encircles the 8,715.3 hectare indigenous forest. Associated fence infrastructure, comprising three fence energizer houses (that hold the fence electrical power systems, accommodation for fence attendants and maintenance tools and materials stores), and 10 lockable metallic fence gates are also fully completed.

 

Rhino Ark and partners are now working towards: (1) establishment of the long-term fence maintenance operating processes, manpower skills development and securing of needed financial resources through the proposed Eburu Trust and Endowment Fund; (2) improving wildlife welfare through establishing safe wildlife corridors linking the forest to the wider Eburu ecosystem and providing water solutions for wildlife inside forest areas that lack surface water; (3) raising the profile of the ecosystem by collecting and disseminating information about the ecosystem’s values; and (4) supporting alternative community livelihood initiatives and conservation education outreach activities.

Now that the nearly 400 km long Aberdare Electric Fence and the 43.3km long Eburu Electric Fence are complete, how can you ensure they will continue to be effective?

Teams of trained fence attendants patrol the fences daily in the Aberdares (114 members) and Eburu (12 members) respectively.  The fence attendants repair and maintain the fences so that they continue to prevent human/wildlife conflict and to protect the forest, thereby providing value to the neighbouring communities and ensuring their continued support.